One-Stop-Shop for all china microscopes
Langue
Track My Order     Shopping Cart:
Home > About Microscopes
About Microscopes

About Fluorescence microscope

A fluorescence microscope (colloquially synonymous with epifluorescence microscope) is an optical microscope used to study properties of organic or inorganic substances using the phenomena of fluorescence and phosphorescence instead of, or in addition to, reflection and absorption.

Technique

In most cases, a component of interest in the specimen can be labeled specifically with a fluorescent molecule called a fluorophore (such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescein or DyLight 488).[1] The specimen is illuminated with light of a specific wavelength (or wavelengths) which is absorbed by the fluorophores, causing them to emit light of longer wavelengths (i.e. of a different color than the absorbed light). The illumination light is separated from the much weaker emitted fluorescence through the use of a spectral emission filter. Typical components of a fluorescence microscope are the light source (xenon arc lamp or mercury-vapor lamp), the excitation filter, the dichroic mirror (or dichromatic beamsplitter), and the emission filter (see figure below). The filters and the dichroic are chosen to match the spectral excitation and emission characteristics of the fluorophore used to label the specimen.[1] In this manner, the distribution of a single fluorophore (color) is imaged at a time. Multi-color images of several types of fluorophores must be composed by combining several single-color images.

Most fluorescence microscopes in use are epifluorescence microscopes (i.e. excitation and observation of the fluorescence are from above (epi–) the specimen). These microscopes have become an important part in the field of biology, opening the doors for more advanced microscope designs, such as the confocal microscope and the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRF).

Fluorophores lose their ability to fluoresce as they are illuminated in a process called photobleaching. Special care must be taken to prevent photobleaching through the use of more robust fluorophores, by minimizing illumination, or by introducing a scavenger system to reduce the rate of photobleaching.

In most cases, a component of interest in the specimen can be labeled specifically with a fluorescent molecule called a fluorophore (such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescein or DyLight 488).[1] The specimen is illuminated with light of a specific wavelength (or wavelengths) which is absorbed by the fluorophores, causing them to emit light of longer wavelengths (i.e. of a different color than the absorbed light). The illumination light is separated from the much weaker emitted fluorescence through the use of a spectral emission filter. Typical components of a fluorescence microscope are the light source (xenon arc lamp or mercury-vapor lamp), the excitation filter, the dichroic mirror (or dichromatic beamsplitter), and the emission filter (see figure below). The filters and the dichroic are chosen to match the spectral excitation and emission characteristics of the fluorophore used to label the specimen.[1] In this manner, the distribution of a single fluorophore (color) is imaged at a time. Multi-color images of several types of fluorophores must be composed by combining several single-color images.[1]

Most fluorescence microscopes in use are epifluorescence microscopes (i.e. excitation and observation of the fluorescence are from above (epi–) the specimen). These microscopes have become an important part in the field of biology, opening the doors for more advanced microscope designs, such as the confocal microscope and the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRF).

Fluorophores lose their ability to fluoresce as they are illuminated in a process called photobleaching. Special care must be taken to prevent photobleaching through the use of more robust fluorophores, by minimizing illumination, or by introducing a scavenger system to reduce the rate of photobleaching.

 
Back to Browsing



 
Newsletter
Getting Updates, Special offers from our website
Follow us:
 ABOUT US

 PAYMENT & SHIPPING

 CUSTOMER SERVICE

 SECURITY & PRIVACY

 RESOURCES

 
Copyright © 2017 Microscopesmall.com All right reserved XML Sitemaps
 
Language Option:


Link: Microscopes, Dental loupes, Surgical headlight, Colposcope, Surgical microscopes, Microscopes parts, Stereo microscopes, Metallurgical microscopes, Flourescenc mcroscopes, window tint tools